I am often asked for homeopathic remedies for rabbit ailments. The following will do no harm and may be helpful.. Tablets, mother tincture and ointments are sold by health food shops and some pharmacies. Administration of tablets can be done whether by placing directly into the mouth, (taking care not to touch the tablet by hand), or by crushing it between two spoons and sprinkling on food or hidden, whole in a piece of bread.

The number appearing after the remedy, eg. Aconite 30, signifies the potency, and only the potency stated should be employed, as although higher potencies will not cause death, they may cause complications if incorrectly used. A dose = 1 tablet. In acute disease the medication should continue for 24-48 hours, increasing the intervals after the symptoms seem to be alleviated.

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Angora wool makes a useful natural fibre to make items of clothing from and one I used recently to make some angora wool hats for a product competition. They are soft,warm and great to wear on a cold day.The Felt hat below was made by Joan Ward, from angora wool and silk.

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Angora rabbit wool is…..and can be made into a range of products including toys, hats, gloves, insoles, booties, shawls, scarfs and so much more, below is a selection of products I have used angora wool in.

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Cream breed standard for the English Angora rabbit

  • Head and feet cream, wool lighter cream with tips to match head
  • Creamy white belly, eyes blue-grey preferred but brown acceptable

The Cream is an Agouti colour. The Cream can be thought of as a dilute Golden (picture on the right) , and a Cream bred to Cream (picture on left, a really good cream colour) for many generations will have the genotype AABBCCddeell. At present this colour is relatively uncommon, although several breeders are now trying to increase the numbers of Cream rabbits available.

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It has taken many years to develop the lovely coloured angoras we now have, many of which match any white in quality, so let us preserve these colours. Recently many people I have talked to have expressed a worry that in order to prevent too much inbreeding of their stock they were beginning to cross colours. I too am guilty of this but I hope I have been doing it responsibly as all colours that are not ‘right’ should be kept at home or sold as pets.

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Lilac breed standard

  • Head, ears and feet dove grey with a very distinct warm tone
  • Wool pale dove grey, the tips (guard hair) to match the head and ears
  • Eyes blue or shades of brown, from dark to pale ochre, often with a warm glow
  • Under colour to match top colour
  • Nails horn coloured in keeping with the dilute nature

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Blue breed standard

  • Head, feet and ears blue, as dark as possible
  • Wool blue without white base
  • Tips to match head
  • Ears and nose to be free of silvering
  • Eyes blue-grey

The Blue is a self colour, and when bred to Blue for several generations has the genotype aaBBCCddEEll. It can be thought of as a dilute Smoke.

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Needle Felting (Art therapy with my Angoras) by Rachel Dunscombe

I have been keeping rabbits since I was 7 years old (first rabbit was and English lop/cross called Loppy) I met my first angora rabbit a few years later, when the mother of my best friend bought a smoke (Blossom) so she could spin and knit the fibre. This was my inspiration for my love of the breed and specifically smoke. Several breeds later I bought my two beautiful boys Benjamin and Elliot from the wonderful Sally May in 2014.

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