Posts categorised: Angora Welfare

Clipping tools

The basic tools for clipping an Angora rabbit are: Apron Decent sharp scissors with either round or pointed ends. Boots hairdressing scissors or Fiskars craft scissors are popular Nail Clippers Ivermectin mite drops (Beaphar antiparasite spot-on for rabbits) used every alternate clipping Self seal heavy duty freezer bags to put wool in Bag or bucket… Read more »

Hutches

Hutches can be a challenge, getting the right size, shape and fit for your environment. These are a few ideas based on what our members do.

Problems with breeding

Breeding Angora rabbits and the problems When the doe is ready to produce it is down to her and it is not always straight forward. The doe produces a litter, but often can scatter babies across the hutch during this process, especially if she is a first time mother. If she has made a nest… Read more »

RHVD 1 and 2 (also see vaccinations)

RHVD is a serious issue for rabbits. There are two forms of the virus. RVHD1 arrived in Britain in the 1990s. It is highly contagious and can spread from rabbit to rabbit and on footwear and clothing. RVHD1 usually only affects rabbits over 2 months old. Symptoms include sudden death, bleeding from orifices, fits and… Read more »

The importance of nail cutting

Domestic rabbits need their nails clipping regularly. The rabbit is held firmly in the lap and the paw stretched gently out. The nails are clipped one by one. It is important to clip only the clear area at the end of the nail. Clipping the pink area of the nail nearest the foot would be… Read more »

Protecting your Angora rabbits from the weather

Angora rabbits are hardy and can be kept outdoors all year round providing they have solid, weatherproof and fox proof hutches and are kept clean and dry. On outdoor hutches, shutters can be used over the mesh of the front in severe weather, leaving a space for ventilation. A good supply of bedding such as… Read more »

Vaccinating your Angora rabbits

Three important diseases, myxomatosis, RVHD1 and RVHD2, are present in the wild rabbit population, and can be spread to domestic rabbits very easily. Whilst wild rabbits have developed some immunity over the years, domestic rabbits haven’t, and vaccination against all 3 is essential to protect them.

Greens for Angora rabbits

Rabbits are herbivores and therefore need green vegetation in their diet. The amount fed varies, usually complementing their dried food and hay. Too many unaccustomed greens can lead to upset stomachs, and regular small amounts are better than too much in one go. Rabbits enjoy their greens, and greens are a healthier treat than the… Read more »